Paco Rabanne the Spanish fashion designer who introduced space age aesthetics to the runway has passed away at the age of 88

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Paco Rabanne the Spanish fashion designer who introduced space age aesthetics to the runway has passed away at the age of 88

Paco Rabanne, a Spanish designer who became famous for his space age creations in the 1960s, has passed away at the age of 88. To quote his former eponymous label: “among the most seminal fashion figures of the 20th century.” This was written more than two decades after he left the company. Many of the most famous celebrities of the 1960s were dressed by Paco Rabanne, including the French singer Francoise Hardy (who wore a minidress made of gold plates and a metal link jumpsuit), the actress Jane Birkin, and the musician Serge Gainsbourg (who wore matching silver outfits). The skintight, figure-hugging outfits he designed for Jane Fonda in Roger Vadim’s cult science fiction film Barbarella are among his most recognisable works. A spokesperson for the Spanish group Puig, which now owns the fashion house, confirmed the death of Francisco Rabaneda y Cuervo, the birth name of Paco Rabanne. According to Marc Puig, chairman and CEO of Puig, “a major personality in fashion, his was a daring, revolutionary, and provocative vision, conveyed through a unique aesthetic.” His mother worked as Balenciaga’s head seamstress before he was born in a small village in the Spanish Basque region in 1934. In France’s Brittany region, in a town called Portsall, he passed away. Rabanne spent his childhood in France, having relocated there after the death of his father, a Republican commander killed by Spanish troops during the civil war. He went to Paris to attend the Ecole des Beaux-Arts and major in architecture. His first job out of school was sketching handbags for a company that supplied Givenchy, Chanel, and Charles Jourdan, among other high-end designers. Then he branched out into the fashion industry, creating garments and jewellery out of metal and plastic.

Development on a Global Scale

Development on a Global Scale Deemed “unwearable dresses made of contemporary materials,” his debut collection featured pieces made of plastic strips linked with metal rings and modelled by footless models at the posh George V hotel in Paris.

Also Read :Google is ready to unveil chatbot technology following the success of ChatGPT

His next show was at the Crazy Horse Saloon in Paris, where models wore hard hats to show off his skimpy dresses and bathing suits. Although he was praised for his groundbreaking ideas and forward-thinking designs, his penchant for the paranormal occasionally brought him into the spotlight for all the wrong reasons. He was well-known for his stories of past lives, and in 1999, he correctly predicted that a solar eclipse would coincide with the crash of the space station Mir into France. The surrealist Salvador Dali was a fan of his fellow countryman and famously dubbed him “Spain’s second genius.” In the late 1960s, the designer collaborated with the Spanish Puig family to launch a line of perfumes that helped launch the company onto the global stage. It was Paco Rabanne’s genius to make transgression attractive. Jose Manuel Albesa, president of Puig’s beauty and fashion division, questioned who else could make “fashionable Parisian women” clamour for dresses made of plastic and metal. Due in large part to Julien Dossena, who reimagined the house’s signature chainmail designs, the label has experienced a renaissance in recent years. The fashion house said in a statement, “We are grateful to Monsieur Rabanne for establishing our avant-garde heritage and defining a future of limitless possibilities.” “so much more than a New Look,” fashion historian Suzy Menkes wrote on Instagram on Friday, praising the designer’s use of metallic plastic to create a “sharp edge” in women’s clothing. “It was quite a revolutionary stance for women who wanted to defend themselves and make their voices heard.”

Paco Rabanne, a Spanish designer who became famous for his space age creations in the 1960s, has passed away at the age of 88. To quote his former eponymous label: “among the most seminal fashion figures of the 20th century.” This was written more than two decades after he left the company. Many of the most famous celebrities of the 1960s were dressed by Paco Rabanne, including the French singer Francoise Hardy (who wore a minidress made of gold plates and a metal link jumpsuit), the actress Jane Birkin, and the musician Serge Gainsbourg (who wore matching silver outfits). The skintight, figure-hugging outfits he designed for Jane Fonda in Roger Vadim’s cult science fiction film Barbarella are among his most recognisable works. A spokesperson for the Spanish group Puig, which now owns the fashion house, confirmed the death of Francisco Rabaneda y Cuervo, the birth name of Paco Rabanne. According to Marc Puig, chairman and CEO of Puig, “a major personality in fashion, his was a daring, revolutionary, and provocative vision, conveyed through a unique aesthetic.” His mother worked as Balenciaga’s head seamstress before he was born in a small village in the Spanish Basque region in 1934. In France’s Brittany region, in a town called Portsall, he passed away. Rabanne spent his childhood in France, having relocated there after the death of his father, a Republican commander killed by Spanish troops during the civil war. He went to Paris to attend the Ecole des Beaux-Arts and major in architecture. His first job out of school was sketching handbags for a company that supplied Givenchy, Chanel, and Charles Jourdan, among other high-end designers. Then he branched out into the fashion industry, creating garments and jewellery out of metal and plastic.

Development on a Global Scale

Development on a Global Scale Deemed “unwearable dresses made of contemporary materials,” his debut collection featured pieces made of plastic strips linked with metal rings and modelled by footless models at the posh George V hotel in Paris.

Also Read :Google is ready to unveil chatbot technology following the success of ChatGPT

His next show was at the Crazy Horse Saloon in Paris, where models wore hard hats to show off his skimpy dresses and bathing suits. Although he was praised for his groundbreaking ideas and forward-thinking designs, his penchant for the paranormal occasionally brought him into the spotlight for all the wrong reasons. He was well-known for his stories of past lives, and in 1999, he correctly predicted that a solar eclipse would coincide with the crash of the space station Mir into France. The surrealist Salvador Dali was a fan of his fellow countryman and famously dubbed him “Spain’s second genius.” In the late 1960s, the designer collaborated with the Spanish Puig family to launch a line of perfumes that helped launch the company onto the global stage. It was Paco Rabanne’s genius to make transgression attractive. Jose Manuel Albesa, president of Puig’s beauty and fashion division, questioned who else could make “fashionable Parisian women” clamour for dresses made of plastic and metal. Due in large part to Julien Dossena, who reimagined the house’s signature chainmail designs, the label has experienced a renaissance in recent years. The fashion house said in a statement, “We are grateful to Monsieur Rabanne for establishing our avant-garde heritage and defining a future of limitless possibilities.” “so much more than a New Look,” fashion historian Suzy Menkes wrote on Instagram on Friday, praising the designer’s use of metallic plastic to create a “sharp edge” in women’s clothing. “It was quite a revolutionary stance for women who wanted to defend themselves and make their voices heard.”

Daniel Harrison

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